HMS Shearwater (1837)
HMS Shearwater (1837)


The Royal Navy

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NameShearwater (1837)Explanation
TypePacket   
Acquired1837
HullWooden
PropulsionPaddle
Builders measure343 tons
Displacement 
Guns 
Fate1857
Class 
Ships book
NoteTransferred from Post Office, ex-Dolphin
Snippets concerning this vessels career
DateEvent
(January 1840)In commission at Liverpool
16 March 1841
- 15 March 1842
Commanded by Commander John Washington, Woolwich for surveying the east coast of England
16 March 1842
- 28 January 1843
Commanded (until paying off at Woolwich) by Captain John Washington, Woolwich for surveying the east coast of England
30 January 1843
- 1847
Commanded by Commander Charles Gepp Robinson, surveying the coast of Scotland
2 March 1848Commanded by Lieutenant commander Edmond Edward Turnour, particular service
9 August 1851Commanded by Lieutenant commander William Horton, Mediterranean
Extracts from the Times newspaper
DateExtract
Ma 16 August 1847

PLYMOUTH, Friday, 3 p.m.

The City of Limerick Dublin steamer, Captain Moppett, which left Southampton yesterday and arrived here to-day, reported that on going through the Needles at 5 o'clock in the afternoon she met a large fleet of yachts, apparently returning from escorting Her Majesty from the Isle of Wight into the Channel.
This morning, between 4 and 5 o'clock, the Limerick descried the Royal steam squadron to the eastward of Start Point. They appeared to have just come out of Dartmouth Harbour. A large ship with two funnels led the van. She was followed by the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert; behind the Royal yacht on the starboard quarter came the Garland, and on the larboard quarter the Black Eagle, The Undine was in the rear of the Garland, and the Fairy followed the Black Eagle. The City of Limerick, with the Company's flag at the main, Ensign aft, and Union Jack at her bow, duly honoured the Royal squadron as she passed under the stern of the Garland and Black Eagle, off Prawl Point, a little after 5 o'clock. There was very little wind. The squadron was at full speed — say, 11 to 12 knots, and steaming a course W. by N., which would bring them abreast of the Lizard. About 6 the Garland put on extra steam, detached herself from the squadron, and steered a more northerly course.
Towards 7 o'clock the squadron was descried from the Breakwater Lighthouse several miles outside the Eddystone, steering for the Lizard. The Royal yacht was a-head, closely followed by the Fairy and Black Eagle. They had outrun the Shearwater and Undine, which were four or five miles astern.
The probability is that Her Majesty will pass Falmouth and proceed direct for Milford Haven, and thus keep her engagements in the St. George's Channel.


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